Artist Entries – The Universal Sea Awards I

Our EU co-funded project The Universal Sea ran three Open Calls to Artists. A big thank to all artists for their great contributions! Here you can find our Top 100 submissions of our first open call from 2017 as a reference. They were all published in the guidebook from 2019.

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The Turner Frequency
by Frederick Hubble
609
Contest is finished!
https://universal-sea.org/calendar/open-call-application-form?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1251
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609
Title:
The Turner Frequency

Author:
Frederick Hubble

Description:
This work is one of a series I plan to develop, this piece was shown as part of a residency in Birmingham, it consists of a small glass sculpture which houses some of the Atlantic Ocean, the form of the piece was inspired by a Storm Glass, a precursor to weather predicting systems invented in the 1800s and popularised after the HMS Royal Charter was sunk off the coast of Anglesey. The body of water which at first seems clear, on closer inspection is comprised of a much more complex mix of saline water and plastic. I wanted the piece to reflect the human impact on the ocean, both on an intimate and universal level. It was shown with a sound installation with just the isolated bass, the sounds were composed of sea shanties, ASMR videos of waves crashing along with other weather phenomena. The sound piece follows the narrative of JMW Turner tying himself to a mast to better paint a storm. The experience of the piece is similar to that of deep sea divers, who can feel passing ships through the sound they emit. In the sound and the object the ocean becomes both homogenised as well as ethereal, there is something strange in the transition from a body of water to a small object, as well as sound containing elements of the sea and the culture surrounding it void of all context but a bodily experience of it. The piece was expanded through another piece collecting the Mediterranean, shown in a handmade glass vitrine, the body of water was kept in the plastic bottle it was gathered in along with sand particles and sea plastic. The piece is accompanied by photographic documentation. This is a body of work I would like to expand, through collecting different seas in different vessels, exploring the narratives and the impact that each body has on the environment as well as the human.
Description:
This work is one of a series I plan to develop, this piece was shown as part of a residency in Birmingham, it consists of a small glass sculpture which houses some of the Atlantic Ocean, the form of the piece was inspired by a Storm Glass, a precursor to weather predicting systems invented in the 1800s and popularised after the HMS Royal Charter was sunk off the coast of Anglesey. The body of water which at first seems clear, on closer inspection is comprised of a much more complex mix of saline water and plastic. I wanted the piece to reflect the human impact on the ocean, both on an intimate and universal level. It was shown with a sound installation with just the isolated bass, the sounds were composed of sea shanties, ASMR videos of waves crashing along with other weather phenomena. The sound piece follows the narrative of JMW Turner tying himself to a mast to better paint a storm. The experience of the piece is similar to that of deep sea divers, who can feel passing ships through the sound they emit. In the sound and the object the ocean becomes both homogenised as well as ethereal, there is something strange in the transition from a body of water to a small object, as well as sound containing elements of the sea and the culture surrounding it void of all context but a bodily experience of it. The piece was expanded through another piece collecting the Mediterranean, shown in a handmade glass vitrine, the body of water was kept in the plastic bottle it was gathered in along with sand particles and sea plastic. The piece is accompanied by photographic documentation. This is a body of work I would like to expand, through collecting different seas in different vessels, exploring the narratives and the impact that each body has on the environment as well as the human.
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