Artist Entries – The Universal Sea Awards I

Our EU co-funded project The Universal Sea ran three Open Calls to Artists. A big thank to all artists for their great contributions! Here you can find our Top 100 submissions of our first open call from 2017 as a reference. They were all published in the guidebook from 2019.

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143
A drop in the ocean
by Diane Watson
5063
Contest is finished!
https://universal-sea.org/calendar/open-call-application-form?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1523
143
5063
Title:
A drop in the ocean

Author:
Diane Watson

Description:
My recent work interprets how eight million tonnes of plastic waste ends up in the sea and oceans every year – much of this waste gets washed up on our beaches. The work highlights how disposable these items have become and how people are oblivious to the long term impact of discarding an object. By using photography and print, the work challenges the viewer to inspect these objects in an unfamiliar context and to re-evaluate our relationship with single use plastics. Manufacturing a single use chip fork is a complex process, from extraction from base petroleum materials, moulding into shape, shipping to retailers, to be used once then discarded. Look again at these objects and consider not just the manufacturing cost but the cost to the environment. My current work comprises images of disposable plastic collected from our beaches and seashores – bottle tops, broken spades, chip forks, cigarette lighters, beach toys and tampons. I have begun to photograph and draw these found objects. A key aim of my current work is to expose and re-evaluate our relationship with plastic by reproducing in detail these items we rarely give a second thought to. ‘A Drop in the Ocean’ explores the issue of ocean plastic. We are now producing nearly 300 million tonnes of plastic every year, half of which is for single use.. My many dog walks along the beautiful north-east coastline have raised my awareness and concern for this environmental issue. Small objects that once belonged to children such as toys, spades, plastic sand moulds and discarded Lego bricks have only heightened the significance of raising awareness of environmental issues, leaving a better place for future generations. Part of my work creates print and wallpaper designs using the discarded plastics but I want to develop these themes further to create a sculptural installation piece from the plastics themselves. Each piece I find has its own story, each discarded plastic toy, broken spade, hair roller, bottle top, plastic peg that has found its way to the beach has been touched by human activity A drop in the ocean is a printed length of paper representing a single tonne of plastic. I have photographed 5kg of plastic and repeated it 200 times to represent just one of the many tonnes of ocean plastics. This print is 90cm wide and 10 metres long.
Description:
My recent work interprets how eight million tonnes of plastic waste ends up in the sea and oceans every year – much of this waste gets washed up on our beaches. The work highlights how disposable these items have become and how people are oblivious to the long term impact of discarding an object. By using photography and print, the work challenges the viewer to inspect these objects in an unfamiliar context and to re-evaluate our relationship with single use plastics. Manufacturing a single use chip fork is a complex process, from extraction from base petroleum materials, moulding into shape, shipping to retailers, to be used once then discarded. Look again at these objects and consider not just the manufacturing cost but the cost to the environment. My current work comprises images of disposable plastic collected from our beaches and seashores – bottle tops, broken spades, chip forks, cigarette lighters, beach toys and tampons. I have begun to photograph and draw these found objects. A key aim of my current work is to expose and re-evaluate our relationship with plastic by reproducing in detail these items we rarely give a second thought to. ‘A Drop in the Ocean’ explores the issue of ocean plastic. We are now producing nearly 300 million tonnes of plastic every year, half of which is for single use.. My many dog walks along the beautiful north-east coastline have raised my awareness and concern for this environmental issue. Small objects that once belonged to children such as toys, spades, plastic sand moulds and discarded Lego bricks have only heightened the significance of raising awareness of environmental issues, leaving a better place for future generations. Part of my work creates print and wallpaper designs using the discarded plastics but I want to develop these themes further to create a sculptural installation piece from the plastics themselves. Each piece I find has its own story, each discarded plastic toy, broken spade, hair roller, bottle top, plastic peg that has found its way to the beach has been touched by human activity A drop in the ocean is a printed length of paper representing a single tonne of plastic. I have photographed 5kg of plastic and repeated it 200 times to represent just one of the many tonnes of ocean plastics. This print is 90cm wide and 10 metres long.
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