Artist Entries – The Universal Sea Awards I

Our EU co-funded project The Universal Sea ran three Open Calls to Artists. A big thank to all artists for their great contributions! Here you can find our Top 100 submissions of our first open call from 2017 as a reference. They were all published in the guidebook from 2019.

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Moving Lemuria
by Laurent Gutierrez
781
Contest is finished!
https://universal-sea.org/calendar/open-call-application-form?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1538
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781
Title:
Moving Lemuria

Author:
Laurent Gutierrez

Description:
Moving Lemuria from the Indian to the Pacific Ocean Black sand (Bali, Indonesia), various shells from Sanibel Island (Florida, US), various plastic trashes (Big Wave Bay, Hong Kong) Myths, legends, stories, histories – as many narratives as possible are needed to define the contours of a new territory. In 1969, Robert Smithson proposed a location of the hypothetical continent of Lemuria starting from the North-East coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Along with the theory of species evolution, the existence and location of Lemuria or Mu (along with Atlantis) has been debated by many diverse scientists during the nineteenth Century. The legendary lost continent took its name after the lemur, an mammal of Madagascar that can be found in India but not in Africa. Zoologist Philip Sclater proposed that the two countries were once part of the same land mass, a larger continent Lemuria - that sunk in the age of the Eocene. At the same period, the idea of bridges and missing links, draw scientific attention towards the Pacific Ocean to explain the distribution of various species across Asia and the Americas. Yet the theory of sunken landmass was rapidly replaced by the analysis of the plate tectonics and continental drift that broke India away millions of years ago. From myth to reality, the identification of what named the Great Pacific Garbage Patch at the end of the nineteen nineties, marked the return of the hypothetical landmass. The Mu, is now a continent in movement that materializes traces of the Anthropocene era with a plastic garbage vortex located in the North Pacific region just above Hawaii, and facing Seattle. Building on, Smithson’s proposal for the location of Lemuria, MAP Office presents a variation to the original installation with a collection of seashells from Sanibel Island, plastic particules and drawings, Moving Lemuria from the Indian to the Pacific Ocean.
Description:
Moving Lemuria from the Indian to the Pacific Ocean Black sand (Bali, Indonesia), various shells from Sanibel Island (Florida, US), various plastic trashes (Big Wave Bay, Hong Kong) Myths, legends, stories, histories – as many narratives as possible are needed to define the contours of a new territory. In 1969, Robert Smithson proposed a location of the hypothetical continent of Lemuria starting from the North-East coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Along with the theory of species evolution, the existence and location of Lemuria or Mu (along with Atlantis) has been debated by many diverse scientists during the nineteenth Century. The legendary lost continent took its name after the lemur, an mammal of Madagascar that can be found in India but not in Africa. Zoologist Philip Sclater proposed that the two countries were once part of the same land mass, a larger continent Lemuria - that sunk in the age of the Eocene. At the same period, the idea of bridges and missing links, draw scientific attention towards the Pacific Ocean to explain the distribution of various species across Asia and the Americas. Yet the theory of sunken landmass was rapidly replaced by the analysis of the plate tectonics and continental drift that broke India away millions of years ago. From myth to reality, the identification of what named the Great Pacific Garbage Patch at the end of the nineteen nineties, marked the return of the hypothetical landmass. The Mu, is now a continent in movement that materializes traces of the Anthropocene era with a plastic garbage vortex located in the North Pacific region just above Hawaii, and facing Seattle. Building on, Smithson’s proposal for the location of Lemuria, MAP Office presents a variation to the original installation with a collection of seashells from Sanibel Island, plastic particules and drawings, Moving Lemuria from the Indian to the Pacific Ocean.
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