Artist Entries – The Universal Sea Awards I

Our EU co-funded project The Universal Sea ran three Open Calls to Artists. A big thank to all artists for their great contributions! Here you can find our Top 100 submissions of our first open call from 2017 as a reference. They were all published in the guidebook from 2019.

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112
Broken Dreams No.1
by Lii Na Klauss
1294
Contest is finished!
https://universal-sea.org/calendar/open-call-application-form?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1585
112
1294
Title:
Broken Dreams No.1

Author:
Lii Na Klauss

Description:
‘Broken Dreams No.1’ consists of 518 broken-down pieces of plastic and natural matter collected on the shores of the South-China Sea over a period of one year. These pieces are organised by colour, luminosity and size. Nothing is manipulated, all pieces are used in the original way they were found. This mosaic of waste is perceived as beautiful. In contrast a single piece of waste is perceived as ugly, dirty and worthless. ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ explores the perception of value and waste in our consumerist society. The objects intrinsically stay the same, but the perception of their worth, beauty and belonging changes depending on context, location and integration into a bigger picture. Is it still waste or is it already beautiful? When exactly does it become art? How much is it worth now? Hasn't it been worthy all along? These questions lead us straight to the values on which our over-saturated consumerist society is built and show us pretty blatantly that worth is something humans create rather than a given. The use of both marine plastic and natural matter for ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ is intentional. Being in nature I become like a child again: open, sensitive, innocent. The guard of criticism drops and waste simply becomes colour within a landscape, pollution becomes a composition for a painting. Today marine pollution gets discussed as if the ocean and plastic were two different entities. The truth I find on beaches is very different: they have become inseparable. Mankind has altered the inner and outer workings of Nature to a point of inseparability. Latest research estimates that by 2050 we will have more plastic than fish (by weight) in our world oceans (Ellen McArthur Foundation, 2016). Plastic has started out as a dream in the 1960ies and has become one of the biggest ecological catastrophes of our time. Display: ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ Objects trouvés on paper
Description:
‘Broken Dreams No.1’ consists of 518 broken-down pieces of plastic and natural matter collected on the shores of the South-China Sea over a period of one year. These pieces are organised by colour, luminosity and size. Nothing is manipulated, all pieces are used in the original way they were found. This mosaic of waste is perceived as beautiful. In contrast a single piece of waste is perceived as ugly, dirty and worthless. ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ explores the perception of value and waste in our consumerist society. The objects intrinsically stay the same, but the perception of their worth, beauty and belonging changes depending on context, location and integration into a bigger picture. Is it still waste or is it already beautiful? When exactly does it become art? How much is it worth now? Hasn't it been worthy all along? These questions lead us straight to the values on which our over-saturated consumerist society is built and show us pretty blatantly that worth is something humans create rather than a given. The use of both marine plastic and natural matter for ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ is intentional. Being in nature I become like a child again: open, sensitive, innocent. The guard of criticism drops and waste simply becomes colour within a landscape, pollution becomes a composition for a painting. Today marine pollution gets discussed as if the ocean and plastic were two different entities. The truth I find on beaches is very different: they have become inseparable. Mankind has altered the inner and outer workings of Nature to a point of inseparability. Latest research estimates that by 2050 we will have more plastic than fish (by weight) in our world oceans (Ellen McArthur Foundation, 2016). Plastic has started out as a dream in the 1960ies and has become one of the biggest ecological catastrophes of our time. Display: ‘Broken Dreams No.1’ Objects trouvés on paper
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