Top 100 artworks

These are our Top 100 submissions of artists for the Universal Sea – pure or plastic?!

 

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Bad luck at sea (drops for Albatross)
by Claire Krouzecky
816
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https://universal-sea.org/top-100-artworks?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=1659
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816
Title:
Bad luck at sea (drops for Albatross)

Author:
Claire Krouzecky

Description:
Glass, paper, sea salt, Indian Yellow pigment, 85,000 drops water from the Indian Ocean. _____ This artwork is a monument to the Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross, whose habits of migration have links to my own personal and familial history of travel and migration between Europe, America and Australia. The adult Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross has a pale grey or white head and nape, with a dark grey mantle, upper wing, and tail. Its rump and underparts are white, and its underwing is white with a black tip with a narrow black margin at the leading edge. Its bill is black with a yellow upper ridge and red tip. The juvenile has a white head and all black bill. Indian Yellow-nosed Albatrosses breed on Prince Edward Islands, the Crozet Islands, Kerguelen Island, Amsterdam Island (on the Falaises d’Entrecasteaux) and St Pauls Islands in the Indian Ocean. Of the estimated population of 180,000 birds, approximately 85,000 migrate to Australian waters. The population has been decreasing steadily for the last 45 years, caused by interactions with longline fisheries and the outbreak of introduced diseases. While searching for food to return to their young, and during migration, Albatross get caught in fishing line left by large scale commercial fishing boats and drown, while their families left ashore starve waiting for their return. Its conservation status in Australia was upgraded from Vulnerable in 2000 to Endangered in 2010. Water for these species is both the life giver and the life taker. _____ In this artwork, originally exhibited in my hometown of Perth, Western Australia (situated along the Indian Ocean coastline) while I was living overseas in the USA, I asked members of my family to collaborate with me in order to realise the work. The work contained one drop of water per remaining individual Albatross in Australia, and manifested as such: 85,000 drops of water from the Indian Ocean (collected by my brother) drip through a valve and stop-cock at the bottom of a suspended glass vessel (blown by my collaborator) slowly dissolving an indian yellow pigment egg (sculpted by my sister) to make a watercolour painting of sorts, on a circular sheet of paper (made by my friend), laying on a bed of sea salt (collected by my other brother), and finally exhibited (checked on regularly by my mother) in my own absence from the exhibition, due to my migration from my hometown overseas.
Description:
Glass, paper, sea salt, Indian Yellow pigment, 85,000 drops water from the Indian Ocean. _____ This artwork is a monument to the Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross, whose habits of migration have links to my own personal and familial history of travel and migration between Europe, America and Australia. The adult Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross has a pale grey or white head and nape, with a dark grey mantle, upper wing, and tail. Its rump and underparts are white, and its underwing is white with a black tip with a narrow black margin at the leading edge. Its bill is black with a yellow upper ridge and red tip. The juvenile has a white head and all black bill. Indian Yellow-nosed Albatrosses breed on Prince Edward Islands, the Crozet Islands, Kerguelen Island, Amsterdam Island (on the Falaises d’Entrecasteaux) and St Pauls Islands in the Indian Ocean. Of the estimated population of 180,000 birds, approximately 85,000 migrate to Australian waters. The population has been decreasing steadily for the last 45 years, caused by interactions with longline fisheries and the outbreak of introduced diseases. While searching for food to return to their young, and during migration, Albatross get caught in fishing line left by large scale commercial fishing boats and drown, while their families left ashore starve waiting for their return. Its conservation status in Australia was upgraded from Vulnerable in 2000 to Endangered in 2010. Water for these species is both the life giver and the life taker. _____ In this artwork, originally exhibited in my hometown of Perth, Western Australia (situated along the Indian Ocean coastline) while I was living overseas in the USA, I asked members of my family to collaborate with me in order to realise the work. The work contained one drop of water per remaining individual Albatross in Australia, and manifested as such: 85,000 drops of water from the Indian Ocean (collected by my brother) drip through a valve and stop-cock at the bottom of a suspended glass vessel (blown by my collaborator) slowly dissolving an indian yellow pigment egg (sculpted by my sister) to make a watercolour painting of sorts, on a circular sheet of paper (made by my friend), laying on a bed of sea salt (collected by my other brother), and finally exhibited (checked on regularly by my mother) in my own absence from the exhibition, due to my migration from my hometown overseas.
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